Home Blog

African Bullfrog Care Sheet

4
African Bullfrog Care
African Bullfrog Care
African Bullfrog
African Bullfrog, photo by Tom M.

Basic Information

  • Common Name: Pyxie Frog
  • Scientific Name: Pyxicephalus adspersus
  • Lifespan: 20 – 40 years
  • Size: 5 – 9 inches
  • Care: Easy
  • Lifestyle: Nocturnal

Tank Size

African Bullfrog Tank Size
African Bullfrog Tank Size

You need to make sure you have the right size tank for your African bullfrog. A tank too small can be very stressful for your frog. Use the guidelines below to help determine the best tank size for your frog:

  • 1 – 5 Inch Frogs: 10 gallon tank
  • 5+ Inch Frogs: 20 gallon long tank or larger

I highly recommend the Exo Terra terrarrium 24 by 18 by 12-Inch or the Exo Terra terrarium 36 by 18 by 18-Inch for this size frog.

 

Note: A screened lid is necessary on the tank enclosure to avoid escapes.

Tank Setup

In order to keep your African bullfrog healthy and happy, you should try to set up the tank as best as possible to mimic their natural environment in the wild. Use the guidelines below to help determine which items to get.

Substrate

African Bullfrog Substrate
African Bullfrog Substrate

African bullfrogs will spend most of their days buried, so you will want to get a nice soft substrate for them to burrow in like Exo Terra plantation soil or Zoo Med eco earth. Once your substrate is in place, give it a nice spray down with clean water. It might be best to soak one side of the tank a bit more than the other so that you can give your bullfrog options for burrowing.

Plants

African Bullfrog Plants
African Bullfrog Plants

In order for your African bullfrog to feel secure and comfortable, a good amount of foliage should be included. You can add fake plants like the Exo Terra Boston fern or real plants like a Pothos. However, if you go with real plants, you’ll need to make sure that you have proper lighting for growing plants in a terrarium. Make sure to always do research on live plants before adding them to your frogs enclosure as some may be toxic to frogs.

 

Don’t forget to clean out the waste weekly and to replace the substrate with fresh substrate once a month to avoid mold and other things from growing in the terrarium.

Lighting & Heating

African Bullfrog Lighting
African Bullfrog Lighting

While there is little data to show whether the use of a UVB bulb in an African bullfrog’s enclosure is beneficial or not, it may not hurt to add a UVB bulb, as it may help aid the frog in processing calcium and other beneficial vitamins. If you are using live plants in the enclosure, you will definitely want to add a UVB bulb to help your plants thrive.

 

Depending on the type of fixture you get, you may decide to go with a fluorescent bulb like the 24 inch Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0 or a mini compact fluorescent bulb like the 13 Watt Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0.

 

Once you get a UVB bulb, you will then want to add a heat lamp to add additional heat if the ambient temperature is too cold (anything below 75°F).  A bulb like the Exo Terra daytime heat lamp will be good. Choose the wattage based on the amount of degrees that you have to raise the tank’s temperature. The more degrees, the higher the wattage.

 

Night temperatures can reach as low as 68°F without needing a heat source. If temperatures drop below that, you may want to consider adding a night time heat lamp like a Zoo Med ceramic heat emitter.

 

Some sources may recommend getting a heat pad for underneath the tank, but it is not needed. Bullfrogs will burrow themselves in the substrate to stay cool. If you put a heat pad under the tank, it will only warm up the substrate. This may cause your African bullfrog to spend most of its days in the water bowl to stay cool.

Temperatures

African Bullfrog Temperature and Humidity Levels
African Bullfrog Temperature and Humidity Levels

When measuring temperatures, it’s best to use digital thermometers. Dial thermometers tend to give off inaccurate measurements. I recommend the

 

For temperature and humidity readings, you can go with a 2-in-1 digital reader like the Exo Terra digital combination thermometer/hygrometer

Day Time

An ambient temperature of 75 – 82°F.

Night Time

An ambient temperature of 68 – 75°F.

Humidity

African Bullfrog Humidity
African Bullfrog Humidity

African bullfrogs need humidity. The best way to calculate how much humidity you have in the tank is by using a hygrometer. Digital hygrometers work best. Humidity levels should be between 70 – 80 %. You can reach these percentages by misting the bullfrogs enclosure twice daily; once in the morning and once again in the afternoon. A water bowl in the enclosure also helps bring up the humidity. If the levels are still not being reached, just mist a few more times throughout the day. You can get a manual mister like the Exo Terra spray bottle or an automatic mister like the Exo Terra Monsoon RS400 Rainfall System. Be very careful not to over saturate the substrate with water. You do not want standing still water in the substrate. This will cause your substrate to rot.

Feeding & Diet

African Bullfrog Calcium
African Bullfrog Calcium

The primary diet of an African bullfrog will consist mostly of live insects including: crickets, silkworms, hornworms, small roaches, night crawlers and other types of worms. As your bullfrog gets bigger, so will its prey. You can then start feeding your adult bullfrog locusts, large roaches, large hornworms, and on occasion the large mouse. Mice should not be fed regularly, and should only be fed once every so often. A diet surrounded primarily on large mice is unhealthy for your frog.

 

Juveniles should be fed 5 – 7 times a week, while adult bullfrogs should be fed around 3 – 4 times a week (every other day). The amount to be fed will vary depending on the size of your bullfrog. I would add a good amount of crickets or other insects into the enclosure and see if your frog has eaten all of them by the next day. If you see that there are still some feeders roaming around the next morning, feed less the next day. If you see that all the insects have been eaten, feed more the next day. Experimenting like this will give you a better idea on how much to feed.

 

The rule of thumb is to make sure the feeder is smaller than the space between its eyes.

 

Their feedings must be dusted with supplements as follows:

If you don’t like touching the insects with your hands, you can get some feeding tongs.

Hydration

For hydration, your bullfrog will use a water bowl to absorb water and to hydrate itself. Water bowls should be cleaned out and refilled daily. If your bullfrog has outgrown most water bowls available, you may want to rearrange your terrarium to be 50/50 with half being land and the other half being water. Having this set up in mind, cleaning might be a headache, so make sure to buy a filter to filter out the water daily.

 

The depth of the water should be no higher than the height of your African bullfrogs mouth when resting.

Water that is safe to use:

  1. De-chlorinated water
  2. Tap water that has been left out for 24 hours uncovered, allowing the chlorine to evaporate
  3. Bottled water

Note: The information on this African bullfrog care sheet is not a substitute for veterinary care.

African Bullfrog Care Questions?

If you have any other questions regarding the care of an African bullfrog, please feel free to ask questions in the comments section below.

Tomato Frog Care Sheet

2
Tomato Frog Care
Tomato Frog Care
Tomato Frog
Tomato Frog, photo by Heather Paul

Info

  • Scientific Name: Dyscophus insularis
  • Lifespan: 6 – 8 years.
  • Handling: Like most frog species, tomato frogs should not be handled regularly. Try to keep handling to a minimum.
  • Size: 2.4 – 4 inches
  • Care: Easy
  • Community: Tomato Frogs may be housed together if they are the same size.
  • Lifestyle: Nocturnal, active at night.

Tank Size

Tomato Frog Tank Size
Tomato Frog Tank Size

You need to make sure you have the right size tank for your tomato frog. A tank too small can be very stressful for your frog. Use the guidelines below to help determine the best tank size for your frog:

  • 1 Frog: 10 gallon tank
  • 2 Frogs: 20 gallon tank
  • 3 Frogs: 30 gallon tank

For every tomato frog you get, add 10 gallons of tank space.

 

I highly recommend the 18x18x18 Exo-Terra Terrarium for this size frog.

 

Note: A screened lid is necessary on the tank enclosure to avoid escapes.

Tank Setup

In order to keep your tomato frog healthy and happy, you should try to set up the tank as best as possible to mimic their natural environment in the wild. Use the guidelines below to help determine which items to get.

Substrate

Tomato Frog Substrate
Tomato Frog Substrate

Tomato frogs will spend most of their days buried, so you will want to get a nice soft substrate for them to burrow in like Exo Terra plantation soil or Zoo Med eco earth. Once your substrate is in place, give it a nice spray down with clean water. It might be best to soak one side of the tank a bit more than the other so that you can give your tomato frog options for burrowing.

Plants

Tomato Frog Plants
Tomato Frog Plants

Foliage helps keep your tomato frog feeling secure and comfortable. You can add fake plants like the Exo Terra Boston fern or real plants like a Pothos. However, if you go with real plants, you’ll need to make sure that you have proper lighting for growing plants in a vivarium. You will also want to keep the live plants in a small pot because tomato frogs love to dig and will usually end up destroying the roots if they aren’t protected.

 

Don’t forget to clean out the waste weekly and to replace the substrate with fresh substrate once a month to avoid mold and other things from growing in the terrarium.

Lighting & Heating

Tomato Frog Lighting
Tomato Frog Lighting

While there is little data to show whether the use of a UVB bulb in a tomato frog’s enclosure is beneficial or not, it may not hurt to add a UVB bulb, as it may help aid the frog in processing calcium and other beneficial vitamins. If you are using live plants in the enclosure, you will definitely want to add a UVB bulb to help your plants thrive.

 

Depending on the type of fixture you get, you may decide to go with a fluorescent bulb like the 18 inch Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0 or a mini compact fluorescent bulb like the 13 Watt Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0.

 

Once you get a UVB bulb, you will then want to add a heat lamp to add additional heat if the ambient temperature is too cold (anything below 75°F). A bulb like the Exo Terra daytime heat lamp will be good. Choose the wattage based on the amount of degrees that you have to raise the tank’s temperature. The more degrees, the higher the wattage.

 

Night temperatures can reach as low as 65°F without needing a heat source. If temperatures drop below that, you may want to consider adding a night time heat lamp like a Zoo Med ceramic heat emitter.

 

Some sources may recommend getting a heat pad for underneath the tank, but it is not needed. Tomato frog’s will burrow themselves in the substrate to stay cool. If you put a heat pad under the tank, it will only warm up the substrate. This may cause your tomato frog to spend most of its days in the water bowl to stay cool.

Temperatures

Tomato Frog Temperature and Humidity Levels
Tomato Frog Temperature and Humidity Levels

When measuring temperatures, it’s best to use digital thermometers. Dial thermometers tend to give off inaccurate measurements.

 

For temperature and humidity readings, you can go with a 2-in-1 digital reader like the Exo Terra digital combination thermometer/hygrometer.

Day Time

Juvenile: 75°F ambient and 80°F warm side

Adult: 75°F ambient and 85°F warm side

Night Time

An ambient temperature of 65 – 75°F.

Humidity

Tomato Frog Humidity
Tomato Frog Humidity

Tomato frogs need humidity. The best way to calculate how much humidity you have in the tank is by using a hygrometer. Digital hygrometers work best. Humidity levels should be between 70 – 80%. You can reach these percentages by misting the frogs enclosure twice daily; once in the morning and once again in the afternoon. A water bowl in the enclosure also helps bring up the humidity. If the levels are still not being reached, just mist a few more times throughout the day. You can get a manual mister like the Exo Terra spray bottle or an automatic mister like the Exo Terra Monsoon RS400 Rainfall System. Be very careful not to over saturate the substrate with water. You do not want standing still water in the substrate. This will cause your substrate to rot.

Feeding & Diet

Tomato Frog Calcium
Tomato Frog Calcium

The primary diet of a tomato frog will consist mostly of live insects including: crickets, silkworms, hornworms, small roaches, night crawlers and other types of worms and insects.

 

Juveniles should be fed 5 – 7 times a week, while adults should be fed around 3 – 4 times a week (every other day). The amount to bed fed will vary depending on the size of your tomato frog. If you have more than 1 tomato frog in the enclosure, make sure that you see each one eating.

 

Never feed anything bigger than what they can handle. The rule of thumb is to make sure the feeder is smaller than the space between its eyes.

 

Their feedings must be dusted with supplements as follows:

If you don’t like touching the insects with your hands, you can get some feeding tongs.

Hydration

For hydration, your tomato frog will use a water bowl to absorb water and to hydrate itself. Water bowls should be cleaned out and refilled daily.

 

The depth of the water should be no higher than the height of your tomato frog’s mouth when resting.

Water that is safe to use:

  1. De-chlorinated water
  2. Tap water that has been left out for 24 hours uncovered, allowing the chlorine to evaporate
  3. Bottled water

Note: The information on this tomato frog’s care sheet is not a substitute for veterinary care.

Tomato Frog Care Questions?

If you have any other questions regarding the care of a tomato frog, please feel free to ask questions in the comments section below.

Dendrobates Auratus Care Sheet

0
Dendrobates Auratus Care
Dendrobates Auratus, photo by brian.gratwicke
Dendrobates Auratus Care
Dendrobates Auratus Care, photo by brian.gratwicke

Info

  • Scientific Name: Litoria caerulea
  • Lifespan: 14 – 20 years.
  • Handling: Frogs of any species are not really supposed to be handled. All frogs have delicate skin and the oils and salts on our skin can cause them harm. Avoid handling unless necessary.
  • Size: 4 – 5 inches
  • Care: Easy
  • Community: They tend to do very well in groups. They can be housed singularly, in pairs, or in groups. When they become sexual maturity at around 10-11 months old, females may eat each others eggs.
  • Lifestyle: Diurnal, active during the day.

Tank Size

Dendrobates Auratus Tank Size
Dendrobates Auratus Tank Size

You need to make sure you have the right size tank for Dendrobates Auratus. A tank too small can be very stressful for your frog. Use the guidelines below to help determine the best tank size for your frog:

  • 1 Frog: 10 gallon tank
  • 2 Frogs: 20 gallon tank
  • 3 Frogs: 30 gallon tank

For every frog you get, add 10 gallons of tank space.

 

Dendrobates Auratus will not climb as much as other varieties of dart frogs, and prefer a horizontally oriented tank. I highly recommend the 18x18x18 Exo-Terra terrarium for up to 3-4 frogs. If you are wanting to keep a larger community of them, I would recommend the Exo Terra terrarrium 24 by 18 by 12-Inch.

Tank Setup

In order to keep your Dendrobates Auratus healthy and happy, you should try to set up the tank as best as possible to mimic their natural environment in the wild. Use the guidelines below to help determine which items to get.

Substrate

Dendrobates Auratus Substrate
Dendrobates Auratus Substrate

Knowing dart frogs need a very humid environment, a drainage layer should be used. The drainage layer will act as an area for excess water to be collected rather than being collected in the soil causing the still water to rot the substrate. You can easily make a drainage layer using Zoo Med HydroBalls and a screen layer. Once your drainage layer is in place, you can start adding the substrate.

 

A very good substrate for dart frogs is a mixture known as ABG mix, which is a blend of tree fern fiber, charcoal, sphagnum peat, long fiber sphagnum, and fir bark. The mix will help live plants thrive, support a good size population of microfauna, and will last many years without having to be replaced. On top of the ABG mix, a nice layer of new zealand sphagnum moss will help aid in keeping humidity levels high. The last layer on top will be leaf litter which helps provide hiding spots for frogs and microfauna. Something like Oak leaves from your backyard or Magnolia leaves will be fine. If you decide to use leaves from your backyard, make sure to wash them thoroughly and dry them out before putting them into the vivarium. The last thing you want is to introduce bacteria and unwanted insects into the vivarium. Make sure to replace the leaves every 4-6 months as this is the time they start to break apart.

 

Once your substrate is in place, you will want to seed it with plenty of microfauna like springtails and isopods to eat any mold growing and to add additional supplemental food for your dart frogs.

Plants and Vines

Dendrobates Auratus plants
Dendrobates Auratus plants

Foliage helps keep your dart frogs feeling secure and comfortable. A good variety of fake plants for dart frogs are the Exo-Terra Bromelia and scindapsus plants. As for vines, the large Exo-Terra jungle vines are my favorite for creating very cool walkways across a vivarium.

 

Generally, dart frogs are kept in naturalistic vivariums with live plants and little to no ventilation. If you decide to use live plants, make sure you have the appropriate lighting to help keep the plants alive and thriving. Some good live plants to keep in a tree frog’s enclosure are Pothos and Bromeliads. Make sure to always do research on live plants before adding them to your frogs enclosure as some may be toxic to frogs.

Lighting & Heating

Dendrobates Auratus lighting
Dendrobates Auratus lighting

While there is little data to show whether the use of a UVB bulb in a dart frog’s enclosure is beneficial or not, it may not hurt to add a UVB bulb, as it may help aid the frog in processing calcium and other beneficial vitamins. If you are using live plants in the enclosure, you will definitely want to add a UVB bulb to help your plants thrive. Depending on the type of fixture you get, you may decide to go with a fluorescent bulb like the 18 inch Zoo Med ReptiSun fluorescent bulb or a mini compact fluorescent bulb bulb like the 13 Watt Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0.

 

Once you get a UVB bulb, you will then want to add a heat lamp to add additional heat if the ambient temperature is too cold (anything below 70°F). A bulb like the Exo Terra daytime heat lamp will be good. Choose the wattage based on the amount of degrees that you have to raise the tank’s temperature. The more degrees, the higher the wattage.

 

Night temperatures can reach as low as 68°F without needing a heat source. If temperatures drop below that, you may want to consider adding a night time heat lamp like a Zoo Med ceramic heat emitter.

Temperatures

Dendrobates Auratus temerature and humidity levels
Dendrobates Auratus temperature and humidity levels

When measuring temperatures, it’s best to use digital thermometers. Dial thermometers tend to give off inaccurate measurements.

 

For temperature and humidity readings, you can go with a 2-in-1 digital reader like the Exo Terra digital combination thermometer/hygrometer.

Day Time

An ambient temperature of 70 – 77 °F.

Night Time

An ambient temperature of 68 – 72 °F.

Humidity

Dendrobates Auratus Humidity
Dendrobates Auratus Humidity

Dart frogs need humidity. The best way to calculate how much humidity you have in the tank is by using a hygrometer. Digital hygrometers work best. Humidity levels should be at about 80%. You can reach these percentages by misting the frogs enclosure twice daily; once in the morning and once again in the afternoon. If the levels are still not being reached, just mist a few more times throughout the day. You can get a manual mister like the Exo Terra spray bottle or an automatic mister like the Exo Terra Monsoon RS400 Rainfall System.

Feeding & Diet

Dendrobates Auratus calcium
Dendrobates Auratus calcium

The primary diet of a dart frog will consist mostly of fruitflies, rice flour beetles, and small phoenix worms, along with the supplemental feeding of microfauna in the vivarium which include springtails and isopods.

 

Their feedings must be dusted with supplements as follows:

Haven’t started culturing your fruit flies yet? Here are some supplies to get you started. This will help you save money, rather than buying cultures every week. All you need to get started are wingless fruit flies and a culture kit.

Hydration

Although most care sheets say “you don’t need a water bowl for dart frogs”, I always add a small dish like the small exo terra dish. This way, it gives the frogs an easy way to self regulate their moisture content. They sit in it and uptake what they need. You still need to maintain high humidity in the tank. It just provides another option for them and a little more insurance for you.

 

The depth of the water should be no higher than the height of your dart frog’s mouth when resting.

Water that is safe to use:

  1. De-chlorinated water
  2. Tap water that has been left out for 24 hours uncovered, allowing the chlorine to evaporate
  3. Bottled water

Dendrobates Auratus Care Questions?

If you have any other questions regarding the care of a Dendrobates Auratus, please feel free to ask questions in the comments section below.

 

Note: The information on this Dendrobates Auratus care sheet is not a substitute for veterinary care.

Pacman (Horned) Frog Care Sheet

1
Pacman Frog Care
Photo by "Mike" Michael L. Baird
Pacman Frog Care
Photo by “Mike” Michael L. Baird

Info

  • Scientific Name: Ceratophrys ornata
  • Lifespan:  7 – 10 years
  • Handling: Most pacman frogs do not like to be handled, and will try to bite. Try to avoid handling your pacman frog unless you have to.
  • Size: 4 – 6 inches
  • Care: Easy
  • Community: Pacman frogs do not do well in groups or with other frogs.
  • Lifestyle: Nocturnal, active at night.

Tank Size

Pacman Frog Tank Size
Pacman Frog Tank Size

You need to make sure you have the right size tank for your Pacman frog. A tank too small can be very stressful for your frog. Use the guidelines below to help determine the best tank size for your frog:

  • 1 – 3 Inch Frogs: 10 gallon tank
  • 4+ Inch Frogs: 20 gallon long tank or larger

I highly recommend the 18x18x18 Exo-Terra terrarium for this size frog.

 

Note: A screened lid is necessary on the tank enclosure to avoid escapes.

Tank Setup

In order to keep your pacman frog healthy and happy, you should try to set up the tank as best as possible to mimic their natural environment in the wild. Use the guidelines below to help determine which items to get.

Substrate

Pacman Frog Substrate
Pacman Frog Substrate

Pacman frogs will spend most of their days buried, so you will want to get a nice soft substrate for them to burrow in like Exo Terra plantation soil or Zoo Med eco earth. Once your substrate is in place, give it a nice spray down with clean water. It might be best to soak one side of the tank a bit more than the other so that you can give your pacman frog options for burrowing.

Plants

Pacman Frog Plants
Pacman Frog Plants

Foliage helps keep your pacman frog feeling secure and comfortable. You can add fake plants like the Exo Terra Boston fern or real plants like a Pothos.  However, if you go with real plants, you’ll need to make sure that you have proper lighting for growing plants in a terrarium. You will also want to keep the live plants in a small pot because tomato frogs love to dig and will usually end up destroying the roots if they aren’t protected.

 

Don’t forget to clean out the waste weekly and to replace the substrate with fresh substrate once a month to avoid mold and other things from growing in the terrarium.

Lighting & Heating

Pacman Frog Lighting
Pacman Frog Lighting

While there is little data to show whether the use of a UVB bulb in a Pacman frog’s enclosure is beneficial or not, it may not hurt to add a UVB bulb, as it may help aid the frog in processing calcium and other beneficial vitamins. If you are using live plants in the enclosure, you will definitely want to add a UVB bulb to help your plants thrive.

 

Depending on the type of fixture you get, you may decide to go with a fluorescent bulb like the 18 inch Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0 or a mini compact fluorescent bulb like the 13 Watt Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0.

 

Once you get a UVB bulb, you will then want to add a heat lamp to add additional heat if the ambient temperature is too cold (anything below 80°F). A bulb like the Exo Terra daytime heat lamp will be good. Choose the wattage based on the amount of degrees that you have to raise the tank’s temperature. The more degrees, the higher the wattage.

 

Night temperatures can reach as low as 70°F without needing a heat source. If temperatures drop below that, you may want to consider adding a night time heat lamp like a Zoo Med ceramic heat emitter.

 

Some sources may recommend getting a heat pad for underneath the tank, but it is not needed. Pacman frog’s will burrow themselves in the substrate to stay cool. If you put a heat pad under the tank, it will only warm up the substrate. This may cause your Pacman frog to spend most of its days in the water bowl to stay cool.

Temperatures

When measuring temperatures, it’s best to use digital thermometers. Dial thermometers tend to give off inaccurate measurements.

 

Pacman frog Temperature and Humidity Levels
Pacman frog Temperature and Humidity Levels

For temperature and humidity readings, you can go with a 2-in-1 digital reader like the Exo Terra digital combination thermometer/hygrometer

Day Time

An ambient temperature of 80 – 85°F.

Night Time

An ambient temperature of 70 – 75°F.

Humidity

Pacman Frog Humidity
Pacman Frog Humidity

Pacman frogs need humidity. The best way to calculate how much humidity you have in the tank is by using a hygrometer. Digital hygrometers work best. Humidity levels should be between 60 – 70%. You can reach these percentages by misting the frogs enclosure twice daily; once in the morning and once again in the afternoon. A water bowl in the enclosure also helps bring up the humidity. If the levels are still not being reached, just mist a few more times throughout the day. You can get a manual mister like the Exo Terra spray bottle or an automatic mister like the Exo Terra Monsoon RS400 Rainfall System. Be very careful not to over saturate the substrate with water. You do not want standing still water in the substrate. This will cause your substrate to rot.

 

For temperature and humidity readings, you can go with a 2-in-1 digital reader like the Exo Terra digital combination thermometer/hygrometer

Feeding & Diet

Pacman Frog Calcium
Pacman Frog Calcium

The primary diet of a pacman frog will consist mostly of live insects including: crickets, silkworms, hornworms, small roaches, night crawlers and other types of worms and insects.

 

Juveniles should be fed 5 – 7 times a week, while adult pacman frogs should be fed around 3 – 4 times a week (every other day). The amount to bed fed will vary depending on the size of your pacman frog. Never feed anything bigger than what they can handle. The rule of thumb is to make sure the feeder is smaller than the space between its eyes.

 

Pacman frogs have what are called Odontodes, which is what we consider teeth. They use their odontodes to capture their prey and this is what makes pacman frog not let go. So if you feed something large to your pacman frog, something it cannot consume; it will be very hard for your pacman frog to let go and the result might be fatal. So make sure the feeders are appropriate size.

 

The rule of thumb is to make sure the feeder is smaller than the space between its eyes.

 

Their feedings must be dusted with supplements as follows:

If you don’t like touching the insects with your hands, you can get some feeding tongs.

Hydration

For hydration, your pacman frog will use a water bowl to absorb water and to hydrate itself. Water bowls should be cleaned out and refilled daily.

 

The depth of the water should be no higher than the height of your Pacman frog’s mouth when resting.

Water that is safe to use:

  1. De-chlorinated water
  2. Tap water that has been left out for 24 hours uncovered, allowing the chlorine to evaporate
  3. Bottled water

Note: The information on this Pacman frog’s care sheet is not a substitute for veterinary care.

Pacman Frog Care Questions?

If you have any other questions regarding the care of a Pacman frog, please feel free to ask questions in the comments section below.

Red Eyed Tree Frog Care Sheet

5
Red Eyed Tree Frog
Red Eyed Tree Frog, photo by Danel Solabarrieta
Red Eyed Tree Frog care
Red Eyed Tree Frog Care, photo by
Danel Solabarrieta

Info

  • Scientific Name: Agalychnis callidryas
  • Lifespan: 4 – 10 years
  • Handling: Frogs of any species are not really supposed to be handled too much. Their type of skin absorbs anything that comes into contact with them, meaning their skin can absorb oils from our hands which in turn, can result in a sick frog. However, if you are going to handle your frog, make sure to wash your hands thoroughly before and after handling it.
  • Size: 2 – 3 inches
  • Care: Medium
  • Community:  Red-eyed tree frogs do best in communities of 2 or more.
  • Lifestyle: Nocturnal, active at night.

Tank Size

Red-Eyed Tree Frog Tank Size
Red-Eyed Tree Frog Tank Size

You need to make sure you have the right size tank for your red-eyed tree frog. A tank too small can be very stressful for your frog. Use the guidelines below to help determine the best tank size for your frog:

  • 1 Frog: 10 gallon tank
  • 2 Frogs: 20 gallon tank
  • 3 Frogs: 30 gallon tank

For every red-eyed tree frog you get, add 10 gallons of tank space.

 

When choosing a tank, it is important to remember that red-eyed tree frogs are arboreal which means they love to climb. Although horizontal space is good, they will prefer more vertical space to climb.

 

I highly recommend the 12x12x18 Exo-Terra terrarium for one red-eyed tree frog and the 18x18x24 Exo-Terra terrarium for 2-3.

Tank Setup

In order to keep your red-eyed tree frog healthy and happy, you should try to set up the tank as best as possible to mimic their natural environment in the wild. Use the guidelines below to help determine which items to get.

Substrate

Red-Eyed Tree Frog Substrate
Red-Eyed Tree Frog Substrate

Most people use paper towels as substrate to avoid impaction when it comes time to feeding, but if you are a big fan of aesthetics and would like a more natural look, you can go with something that looks natural and is still safe, like Exo Terra river rocks. Another option which may help help grow plants and help aid in maintaining humidity levels is a loose type substrate like Exo Terra plantation soil or Zoo Med eco earth.

 

If you are worried about creating a muddy environment with too much water being sprayed daily, you can add a false bottom using Zoo Med HydroBalls and a screen layer. The false bottom will act as an area for excess water to be collected, rather than being collected in the substrate causing the still water to rot the substrate.

Plants & Vines

Red-Eyed Tree Frog Plants
Red-Eyed Tree Frog Plants

Foliage helps keep your red-eyed tree frog feeling secure and comfortable. Knowing tree frogs are arboreal, you will want to add plenty of plants, vines, and branches throughout the enclosure. My favorite plants for red-eyed tree frogs are the Exo-Terra Pandanus, Bromelia, and scindapsus plants. These plants have some pretty nice big leaves that your red-eyed tree frog will most likely use for sleeping on. As for vines, the large Exo-Terra jungle vines are my favorite for creating very cool walkways across a vivarium.

 

If you decide to use live plants, make sure you have the appropriate lighting to help keep the plants thriving. Some good live plants to keep in a tree frog’s enclosure are Pothos and Bromeliads. Make sure to always do research on live plants before adding them to your frogs enclosure as some may be toxic to frogs.

 

Don’t forget to clean out the waste weekly and to replace the substrate with fresh substrate once a month to avoid mold and other things from growing in the terrarium. If you are using river rocks, just make sure you remove them every once in a while and wash them thoroughly.

Lighting & Heating

Red-Eyed Tree Frog Lighting
Red-Eyed Tree Frog Lighting

While there is little data to show whether the use of a UVB bulb in a red-eyed tree frog’s  enclosure is beneficial or not, it may not hurt to add a UVB bulb, as it may help aid the frog in processing calcium and other beneficial vitamins. If you are using live plants in the enclosure, you will definitely want to add a UVB bulb to help your plants thrive.

Depending on the type of fixture you get, you may decide to go with a fluorescent bulb like the 18 inch Zoo Med ReptiSun fluorescent bulb or a mini compact fluorescent bulb bulb like the 13 Watt Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0.

 

Once you get a UVB bulb, you will then want to add a heat lamp to add additional heat if the ambient temperature is too cold (anything below 72°F). A bulb like the Exo Terra daytime heat lamp will be good. Choose the wattage based on the amount of degrees that you have to raise the tank’s temperature. The more degrees, the higher the wattage.

 

Night temperatures can reach as low as 70°F without needing a heat source. If temperatures drop below that, you may want to consider adding a night time heat lamp like a Zoo Med ceramic heat emitter.

Temperatures

Red-Eyed Tree Frog Temperature and Humidity Levels
Red-Eyed Tree Frog Temperature and Humidity Levels

When measuring temperatures, it’s best to use digital thermometers. Dial thermometers tend to give off inaccurate measurements.

 

For temperature and humidity readings, you can go with a 2-in-1 digital reader like the Exo Terra digital combination thermometer/hygrometer.

Day Time

An ambient temperature of 72 – 78 °F.

Night Time

An ambient temperature of 70 – 75 °F.

Humidity

Red-Eyed Tree Frog Humidity
Red-Eyed Tree Frog Humidity

Red-eyed frogs need humidity. The best way to calculate how much humidity you have in the tank is by using a hygrometer. Digital hygrometers work best. Humidity levels should be between 60 – 70%. You can reach these percentages by misting the frogs enclosure twice daily; once in the morning and once again in the afternoon. If the levels are still not being reached, just mist a few more times throughout the day. You can get a manual mister like the Exo Terra spray bottle or an automatic mister like the Exo Terra Monsoon RS400 Rainfall System.

Feeding & Diet

Red-Eyed Tree Frog Calcium

The primary diet of a red-eyed tree frog will consist mostly of live insects including: crickets, silkworms, hornworms, small roaches, night crawlers and other types of worms and insects. Feeding each red-eyed tree frog 2 – 6 crickets every two days should be enough to keep them full and happy. If you have more than 1 red-eyed tree frog in the enclosure, make sure that you see each one eating.

 

The rule of thumb is to make sure the feeder is smaller than the space between its eyes.

Their feedings must be dusted with supplements as follows:

If you don’t like touching the insects with your hands, you can get some feeding tongs.

Hydration

For hydration, your red-eyed tree frog will use a water bowl to absorb water and to hydrate itself. Water bowls should be cleaned out and refilled daily.

 

The depth of the water should be no higher than the height of your red eyed tree frog’s mouth when resting.

Water that is safe to use:

  1. De-chlorinated water
  2. Tap water that has been left out for 24 hours uncovered, allowing the chlorine to evaporate
  3. Bottled water

Make sure to keep the enclosure clean. The main reason for death among most red-eyed tree frogs is a disease called the “red leg disease”. The disease mainly occurs when enclosures are not kept clean. If this occurs, there really isn’t anything to reverse the disease sadly, so make sure everything is cleaned very well and is kept clean.

 

Also, it is not a good idea to stick a brand new red-eyed tree frog that you just bought into an enclosure with a red-eyed tree frog that you have had for a while. If the new red-eyed tree frog has any diseases, it can be passed on to your old red-eyed tree frog, cause the both of them to become ill. I recommend to put your new frog into a separate tank for at least a month, and if he/she is perfectly fine with no health issues, that is when you can introduce the frogs to one another. It’s best to just buy the red-eyed tree frogs together to not have to go through this hassle later on.

Red-Eyed Tree Frog Care Questions?

If you have any other questions regarding the care of a red-eyed tree frog, please feel free to ask questions in the comments section below.

 

Note: The information on this red-eyed tree frog care sheet is not a substitute for veterinary care.

Fire-Bellied Toad Care Sheet

0
Fire Bellied Toad Care
Fire Bellied Toad, photo by Roberto Verzo
Fire Bellied Toad Care
Fire Bellied Toad, photo by Roberto Verzo

Info

  • Scientific Name: Bombina
  • Lifespan: 15 years.
  • Handling: Frogs of any species are not supposed to be handled too much. Their type of skin absorbs anything that comes into contact with them. Meaning their skin can absorb our oils from our hands which in turn, can result in a sick frog. However, if you are going to handle your frog, make sure to wash your hands thoroughly before and after handling it.
  • Size: 2 inches.
  • Care: Easy
  • Community: You may house a group of fire bellied toads together.
  • Lifestyle: Diurnal, active during the day.

Tank Size

Fire-Bellied Toad Tank Size
Fire-Bellied Toad Tank Size

You need to make sure you have the right size tank for your fire bellied toad. A tank too small can be very stressful for your frog. Use the guidelines below to help determine the best tank size for your frog:

  • 1-3 fire bellied toads: 10 gallon tank
  • 4-5 fire bellied toads: 15 gallon tank
  • 6-7 fire bellied toads: 20 gallon long tank

I highly recommend the 18x18x18 Exo-Terra terrarium for up to 4 fire-bellied toads. If you are wanting to keep a larger community of them, I would recommend the Exo Terra terrarrium 24 by 18 by 12-Inch.

Tank Setup

In order to keep your fire-bellied toads healthy and happy, you should try to set up the tank as best as possible to mimic their natural environment in the wild. Use the guidelines below to help determine which items to get.

Substrate

Fire-bellied toads are semi-aquatic so you will want to set up an enclosure with a 50/50 ratio of water to land. For the land portion, you can use a substrate like turtle pebbles. These pebbles are too large for fire-bellied toads to accidentally ingest, and will add a nice naturalistic feeling to the habitat. When placing the pebbles, you will want to create a beach/slope going into the water so that your fire-bellied toad(s) can easily get into and out of the water. As for the water portion, you can leave it alone and keep it bare bottom (will be easier to clean later on), or add a thin layer of turtle pebbles.

 

If you decide to create a habitat as suggested above, you should consider adding a stand-up water filter like the Whisper In-Tank Filter. If you are looking for something a little more aesthetic, check out the Tetra Decorative Filter.

Pants and Hides

Fire-Bellied Toad Plants
Fire-Bellied Toad Plants

Foliage helps keep your fire-bellied toads feeling secure and comfortable. On the land, it may be best to add a hide like a coconut hide and some fake plants like a small Exo-Terra mandarin. If you decide to use live plants, make sure you have the appropriate lighting to help keep the plants alive and thriving. Some good live plants to keep in a fire-bellied toad’s enclosure are Pothos and Bromeliads. Make sure to always do research on live plants before adding them to your frogs enclosure as some may be toxic to frogs.

 

Don’t forget to clean out the waste weekly, as mold may start to form around some of the feces, especially in a wet environment.

Lighting & Heating

Fire-Bellied Toad Lighting
Fire-Bellied Toad Lighting

While there is little data to show whether the use of a UVB bulb in a fire-bellied toad’s enclosure is beneficial or not, it may not hurt to add a UVB bulb, as it may help aid the frog in processing calcium and other beneficial vitamins. If you are using live plants in the enclosure, you will definitely want to add a UVB bulb to help your plants thrive. Depending on the type of fixture you get, you may decide to go with a fluorescent bulb like the 18 inch Zoo Med ReptiSun fluorescent bulb or a mini compact fluorescent bulb bulb like the 13 Watt Zoo Med ReptiSun 5.0.

 

Once you get a UVB bulb, you will then want to add a heat lamp to add additional heat if the ambient temperature is too cold (anything below 72°F). A bulb like the Exo Terra daytime heat lamp will be good. Choose the wattage based on the amount of degrees that you have to raise the tank’s temperature. The more degrees, the higher the wattage.

 

Night temperatures can reach as low as 70°F without needing a heat source. If temperatures drop below that, you may want to consider adding a night time heat lamp like a Zoo Med ceramic heat emitter.

Temperatures

Fire-Bellied Toad Temperature and Humidity Levels
Fire-Bellied Toad Temperature and Humidity Levels

When measuring temperatures, it’s best to use digital thermometers. Dial thermometers tend to give off inaccurate measurements.

 

For temperature and humidity readings, you can go with a 2-in-1 digital reader like the Exo Terra digital combination thermometer/hygrometer.

Day Time

An ambient temperature of 72 – 78 °F.

Night Time

An ambient temperature of 70 – 75 °F.

Humidity

Having an enclosure with a ratio of 50/50 water to land will help achieve desirable humidity levels of 50-80%. However, if you are only panning on inserting a big water dish for the water portion, you may need to spray the enclosure down a few times throughout the day to help increase humidity levels.

 

Water that is safe to use:

  1. De-chlorinated water
  2. Tap water that has been left out for 24 hours uncovered, allowing the chlorine to evaporate
  3. Bottled water

Feeding & Diet

Fire-Bellied Toad Calcium
Fire-Bellied Toad Calcium

The primary diet of a fire-bellied toad will consist mostly of live insects including: crickets, silkworms, hornworms, small roaches, night crawlers and other types of worms and insects. Feeding each fire-bellied toad 3 – 6 crickets every two days should be enough to keep them full and happy. If you have more than 1 fire-bellied toad in the enclosure, make sure that you see each one eating.

 

The rule of thumb is to make sure the feeder is smaller than the space between its eyes.

 

Their feedings must be dusted with supplements as follows:

If you don’t like touching the insects with your hands, you can get some feeding tongs.

Fire-Bellied Toad Care Questions?

If you have any other questions regarding the care of a fire-bellied toad, please feel free to ask questions in the comments section below.

 

Note: The information on this fire-bellied toad care sheet is not a substitute for veterinary care.

How to Get Rid of Dog Fleas

0
How to Get Rid of Dog Fleas
How to Get Rid of Dog Fleas
How to Get Rid of Dog Fleas
How to Get Rid of Dog Fleas, photo by buckbeak888

Below are a few methods on how to get rid of dog fleas and flea eggs. Lets face it, dog fleas are not wanted and are uninvited. If you don’t take care of the problem soon, there will be an infestation in no time. Trust me, I’ve dealt with this problem before.

What are Dog Fleas?

Dog fleas are a species of flea that lives as an ectoparasite mainly on your average dog and cat. But have in mind, dog fleas can latch onto other small animals as well. So if you have any other furry animals, make sure to check them for fleas too.

The Life Cycle of Dog Fleas

There are 4 main stages of the dog flea. It is important to know the stages in order to get rid of dog fleas appropriately.

Flea Adult

Flea problems always start off with the adults. Adults will usually latch onto your dog and then start its problems from there. The average adult flea usually lives close to 100 days. Within those 100 days, they are looking to feed and breed. They can not do any of this without a host (dog or other animal). Without a blood meal, female adults wont usually lay their eggs. But with a blood meal, females can lay close to 50 eggs per day, and in total (about 500 – 600 eggs).  The eggs will usually be laid in between your dogs hairs where you can’t see them and will usually fall right into your carpets, dog beds, your beds, cracks in floors, and etc. Wherever your dog goes, the eggs have a chance to be there.

Flea Eggs

Flea eggs are white in color, almost see through. Eggs need temperatures of about 70 – 80 degrees Fahrenheit (21 degrees Celcius) and 70 – 85 percent humidity to hatch. The eggs will usually hatch within about 12 days of being laid. Once they are hatched, they are now at the larvae stage.

Flea Larva (plural – larvae)

Larvae are about 1/4″ (6.35 mm) long and semi-transparent white. They avoid light and migrate toward cracks in the floor, where they remain for their development. Their bodies contain very small hairs, allowing them to move to other places. Unlike adult fleas, they do not consume blood from a host. They will usually just eat adult flea feces (dried blood) and other debris found in the carpets. They will normally retreat to dark places (cracks in the floor). Depending on the amount of food present and the environmental conditions, the larval stage lasts about 5 – 18 days (longer in some cases), then the larva spins a cocoon and pupates (turns into a pupae).

Flea Pupae

Pupae is the last stage before your flea emerges and turns into an adult flea. Fleas will normally emerge within 5 – 10 days if their is plenty of food (a host) around. Vibrations, room temperatures, high humidity, and carbon dioxide from a passing dog can trigger the emerge response.  If the conditions aren’t right and there isn’t any food around, the fleas can stay cocooned up for a full year!

 

How to Find Fleas on your Dog

The best way to look for dog fleas is to run a dog brush through your dogs fur. Make sure to get a dog brush that has very thin openings between the bristles so you can capture anything that comes in contact with your brush like fleas and flea poop. At this point, you are just trying to find the flea poop. Flea poop looks like little pieces of black specs. If you get a few black specs, add it to a wet paper towel and rub it in. If the paper towel starts to show a red/brown color, it is definitely flea poop. Flea poop is just dried blood which is why it will turn the paper towel a brown/red color. The reason why you want to double-check with the paper towel is because the black specs could just be dirt.
Once you find out your dog has flea poop on him, you will want to start checking for fleas. Checking for fleas is quite easy, but may be a little time-consuming. To start, check by turning your dog over and check the underbelly and your dogs armpits. These are the places with the least amount of hair, so spotting a flea will be easy if they are there. After that, start checking through your dogs hair starting by the tail area. Simply pull the hairs back to where you only see skin, and work your way up. Once you see one flea, stop and start prepping for a bath. If you check the entire dog for fleas, you will cause disturbance and a lot of flea movement. The last thing you want is for the fleas to work their way up to the head area and possibly the ears. Once they go in the ears, they will be very hard to get out and can cause problems.

How to Get Rid of Dog Fleas

Below are 7 ways you can get rid of dog fleas from your dog and your house.

  1. Bathe Dog(s) with Flea Shampoo – Bathing your dog with a special flea shampoo like Adams Plus Flea and Tick Control should clear up your dogs fur dramatically. Make sure to place your dog in a clean environment afterwards while you clean the other areas of your house from fleas. The last thing you want is for fleas to hop right back on.
  2. Vacuum – Vacuuming is the fastest and easiest way to remove the majority of the fleas in your house. The suction of the vacuum will suck up most of the live fleas, larvae, pupae and eggs. Make sure to get all the cracks and dark places in your floors.
  3. Throw Away the Dog Bed – Your dogs bed is probably infested with a ton of live fleas and ton of flea eggs. Dog beds act as an incubator for the eggs. The best thing to do would be to throw away the dog bed and just get a new one. It’s not worth the risk to try to clean it yourself, because even if one female survives in the wash, you will have the same problem later on.
  4. Salt on Carpets – Before you vacuum, apply salt to the carpets in your house. Salt takes the moisture out of things and will kill any fleas that the salt latches onto. DO NOT put salt on your dogs fur.
  5. Lemon Spray – Fleas hate lemon. Slice a lemon thinly, add it to a pint of water, and let it come to a boil. Let it sit overnight and then pour it into a spray bottle and spray it over your carpets. (Beware of staining).
  6. Dehumidifier – dehumidifiers take the moisture out of the air. They are great to use as they will take the moisture out of the air killing the fleas. Remember, fleas need 50% or higher humidity to live. Lowering the humidity levels will kill them.
  7. Flush or Throw Away the Fleas – Trying to kill a flea is the hardest thing to do. If you find some, flush them. Stepping on them and squeezing them sometimes wont kill them. They have a very strong exoskeleton.

How to Kill Fleas on Dogs and Puppies

The best way to kill fleas on dogs and puppies is to bathe them. Below are the steps to take when bathing your dog.

  1. Prepare Bath – Get everything you need for the bath. (Brush, water cup, measuring cup, flea shampoo, towel, and etc..)
  2. Prepare Measurements – Measure the correct amount of shampoo you need in a measuring cup. Flea shampoos are very strict on how much shampoo to use because of how powerful the shampoo is.
  3. Water Rinse – Lightly run water on the  entire dog wetting him.
  4. Shampoo Barrier – Pour a little bit of the shampoo on the neck area and start rubbing it in really good. This will create a barrier for the fleas, so they don’t work their way up to your dogs face and ears while you rub in the shampoo all over the rest of the body.
  5. Shampoo Scrub – Pour the rest of the shampoo on your dogs back and start rubbing in the shampoo all over the body. Make sure you rub it in for a good amount of time. The shampoo I used was ‘Adams Flea & Tick Shampoo’ and the directions were to rub it in for a good 10 minutes. After about 5 minutes of rubbing in the shampoo, I was seeing a lot of dead fleas surfacing the dogs fur. I was amazed of how fast it worked.
  6. Rinse off – Start rinsing the shampoo off your dogs fur. Make sure to get it all out. You don’t want the shampoo to stay in your dogs fur. Also, make sure you get out all of the dead fleas. You don’t want any dead fleas staying in your dogs fur. At this point, you should see many dead fleas in the bath tub.
  7. Dry – Dry your dog with the towel and do one more check for fleas. Normally you wont see anything, but sometimes their might a straggler or two.
  8. Re-check – At this point your dog will be clean of fleas. You want to make sure no other fleas get to your dog, so make sure to put your dog somewhere that is free of fleas while you clean and vacuum the rest of the house.
  9. Dog Flea Repellent – If you want to take another step forward to really prevent this from happening again, you may want to get a brand name flea repellent to apply to your dog which they sell online or at most pet shops. This can help your dog stay free of fleas.

Dog Flea Repellents

Once the solution is solved, it may be best to add a dog flea repellent to your dog so the fleas stay away. There are plenty of repellents out there. Below are a few suggestions on which route to go. Do your research and pick the best one you think will help your dog.

  1. Bayer Advantage II – Protects against fleas, flea larvae, flea eggs, and lice (dogs only). It is a monthly flea preventive for dogs. Kills fleas on contact within 12 hours, they do not have to bite your pet to die. Should only be used for dogs 7 weeks of age or older. This treatment is waterproof as well, so its great for dogs who swim or are exposed to a lot of moisture.
  2. Bayer Advantix II –  Protects against fleas and ticks, and biting mosquitoes for one full month. Kills 100% percent of adult fleas within 12 hours.
  3. Frontline Plus (45 – 88lb dog) – Is a monthly topical flea and tick preventative for dogs and cats. Frontline Plus kills 100% of adult fleas on your pet within 12 hours and 100% of all ticks and chewing lice within 48 hours. This treatment is waterproof as well, so its great for dogs who swim or are exposed to a lot of moisture.
  4. Comfortis Chewable Tablets for Dogs –  These beef-flavored tablets are used to kill existing fleas on dogs and are used to prevent flea infestations for one full month. Fleas will start to die within 30 minutes of the table being eaten. Within 4 hours, 98%-100% of the fleas will die. The tablets are FDA approved and are only recommended for dogs 3.3 lbs or heavier.

 

That is really all there is to it on how to get rid of dog fleas. Hopefully this article has helped or will help you with your flea problem. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to get rid of fleas, feel free to comment below.

6 Popular Geckos as Pets

3
Leopard Gecko
Leopard Gecko, photo by Kouneli

Below is a list of a few different types of geckos that are available in today’s pet market. Some geckos are easy to care for, while others  require a little more maintenance. Make sure to do some reading on gecko care before getting one. Keeping geckos as pets can be fun and interesting. With the right care and maintenance, some of these geckos can outlive your normal dog or cat, so be ready for a commitment if you are deciding to get one.

Geckos as Pets

Below are 6 of the most popular geckos kept as pets. The first four are great for beginners, while the last two are more for advanced keepers.

Leopard Gecko
Leopard Gecko, photo by Kouneli

Leopard Gecko

Leopard geckos make great first pets for anyone of any age. They are easy to take care of and are easily tamed. Most leopard geckos will come tame right out of the pet shop, meaning they will tolerate being handled. This is why they are so popular amongst new reptile owners. The only downfall of keeping a leopard gecko is their diet. Leopard geckos are insectivorous, and therefore can only be maintained on a diet of various live insects including mealworms and crickets. Other than that, leopard geckos make great pets.

Price: $20+

African Fat Tailed Gecko
African Fat Tailed Gecko, photo by
Ihkura

African Fat-Tailed Gecko

African Fat-Tailed Geckos are what most people call the ‘cousin’ of leopard geckos. The reason behind this is because of their appearance. If you place a leopard gecko and African fat-tailed gecko side-by-side, they will appear to look very similar. However, they are not. Their origins differ and they require different care needs. Unlike the leopard gecko who needs a dry environment, African fat-tailed geckos need a more humid environment. Another difference is their appearance. If you look closely, African fat-tailed geckos will appear to be stockier with bulkier heads. In regards to their diet, they are also insectivorous.

Price: $50+

Crested Gecko
Crested Gecko, photo by Jennifer Morrow

Crested Gecko

Crested geckos are for those who aren’t really into insects. This type of gecko can be fed a diet primarily based off of a powdered formula that mixes with water. Although their diet consists of this fruity powder mix, they should still be fed live insects 20% of their diet. This will ensure a healthier life for your crested gecko. Unlike the previous geckos, crested geckos are arboreal, which means they like to climb up and down and live in trees. Their terrarium should be set up with lots of vines, branches, and plenty of foliage to climb, jump, and hide in. They also like their environments to be humid, so misting them and their terrarium is a must.

Price: $30+

Gargoyle Gecko
Gargoyle Gecko, photo by
Wikimedia

Gargoyle Gecko

Gargoyle geckos can be summarized similar to the crested gecko. Their care requirements, enclosure, diet, and temperament are all very similar to the crested gecko above. It is said by many gargoyle keepers that gargoyle geckos have more of an individual personality, which is why some people may prefer them over crested geckos. They are also less jumpy then crested geckos, which might be better for those who want a calmer gecko to handle. Another difference is their tail. When crested geckos detach their tails from their body, they do not grow back. But when gargoyle geckos drop their tails, they do grow back.

Price: $50+

Madagascar Giant Day Gecko
Madagascar Giant Day Gecko, photo by
flickr

Giant Day Gecko

The giant day gecko is one of the more colorful types of gecko species that you can keep as a pet. With their vibrant colors, day geckos are quite something to admire. Although they are beautiful, you really shouldn’t try to handle them. Giant day geckos are very fast and fragile, so handling should be kept to a minimum. Their enclosure should be spacious with plenty of vines, foliage, branches, and live plants that aid in raising humidity levels. Their diet consists of a mixture between live insects and acceptable fruit mixtures made specifically for them.

Price: $30

Tokay Gecko
Tokay Gecko, photo by
wikimedia

Tokay gecko

The tokay gecko is a great gecko for those who do not like to hold their lizards. This type of gecko is a “see, but don’t touch” type of pet. The reason is because of their attitude and aggressiveness. They do not tolerate being handled like most other pet geckos and will usually end up biting their owners. Growing as large as 14 inches in length, this is not a gecko that is easily moved and transported, so cleaning a terrarium will be difficult, especially with the feisty gecko inside of it. However, with experience and extreme care, keeping a tokay gecko can be done.

Price: $10+

 

What’s the Best Pet Gecko?

Although they all make great pets, we decided to vote the leopard gecko as the best pet gecko taking costs, handling, care, and overall pet needs into consideration. Which gecko species do you think is the best pet gecko to keep as a pet? Share with us your thoughts and recommendations down below in the comments section.

26 Types of Ball Pythons & Morphs

18
Ball Python Morphs
Ball Python Morphs, photo by ChrisPar

Below is a list of a few different types of ball pythons that are available in today’s pet market. Although there are over 1,000 different types of ball python morphs, we only list 26 of the more widely known ones. Prices of these ball pythons are only estimates of what they could go for. Prices vary depending on morph, size, age, gender, popularity, and availability.

 

Albino Ball Python
Albino Ball Python, photo by Wikimedia

Albino Ball Python

The albino ball python was the first proven recessive ball python mutation. Being albino, this python has no dark pigments, leaving this snake bright white and yellow with pink/red eyes.

 

Price: $300 – $400

Axanthic Ball Python
Axanthic Ball Python, photo by Tsanford

Axanthic ball python

The axanthic ball python is a recessive mutation that produces a snake that has varying shades of silver/grey, white, black, and brown. As axanthic’s age, they develop more of a brown color to them. Only a select few will keep the same coloration they had as juveniles. The image shown is a VPI axanthic ball python.

 

Price: $375 +

Blue Eyed Leucistic Ball Python
Blue Eyed Leucistic Ball Python, photo by Pendleton Pythons

Blue Eyed Leucistic Ball Python

The blue eyed leucistic ball python, also known as the ‘Blue Eyed Lucy’ is a very rare ball python to come across in the pet trade. This beautiful snake is solid white with piercing blue eyes. Some of the morphs that will normally produce this beauty are Mojaves, Lessers, Butters, Phantoms, and Het Russos bred together.

 

Price: $400 – $600

Butter Ball Python
Butter Ball Python, photo by Robin

Butter Ball Python

The butter ball python is very similar in appearance to the lesser ball python, but they come from a complete different bloodline. Butters are known to brighten up in color as they age, rather than get darker like some other types of ball python morphs. The butter is a mixture of genes with the Lesser, Mojave, Russo, and Phantom.

 

Price: $90

Bumblebee Ball Python
Bumblebee Ball Python, photo by Don

Bumblebee Ball Python

The bumblebee ball python is a beautiful yellow and black snake. To get this beauty, you must breed a spider ball python with a pastel ball python. The bumblebee ball python is not usually found in the wild.

 

Price: $169

Candino Ball Python
Candino Ball Python, photo by
West Coast Jungle

Candino Ball Python

The candino ball python is similar to the albino ball python in appearance (using albino genes), but is made with other genes apart from albino. Candy is a recessive mutation but is allelic to albino. So, for example, crossing a candy to an albino would yield all candinos. (Duxorw)

 

Price: $400

Champagne Ball Python
Candino Ball Python, photo by
Celtic Serpents

Champagne Ball Python

The champagne ball python is a light tan/orange colored snake with irregular dorsal stripes and circles. Addition to the beautiful color and markings, this snake has an all white color belly. The Champagne ball python has also proven to be a dominant morph.

 

Price: $250

Chocolate Ball Python
Chocolate Ball Python, photo by
PythonDreams

Chocolate Ball Python

Information coming soon on the chocolate ball python.

 

Price: $100

Cinnamon Ball Python
Cinnamon Ball Python, photo by
Rad

Cinnamon Ball Python

The cinnamon ball python is a dark brown snake, with darker colored markings around its body. The brown color that this snake portrays almost mimics the color of cinnamon, which is where this snake gets its name from. The cinnamon is a co-dominant gene.

 

 

Price: $70

Coral Glow Ball Python
Coral Glow Ball Python, photo by
Rain

Coral Glow Ball Python

The coral ball python is a co-dominant gene that has purple and orange colors. The colors on this snake are almost unbelievable. Some of these coral glows are known to be male makers, only producing male coral glows (no females).

 

Price: $350

Fire Ball Python
Fire Ball Python, photo by
Tarkah

Fire Ball Python

The fire ball python is a co-dominant gene that can make up a super fire ball python which is also known as the black eyed leucistic. The fire ball python is a lot lighter in color, compared to a normal ball python. They also have different markings.

 

Price: $400

Ghost Ball Python
Ghost Ball Python, photo by
Wikimedia

Ghost Ball Python

The ghost ball python is a recessive mutation that reduces the black pigmentation. A ghost ball python’s colors will always appear to be hazy. (Tony Gude)

 

 

Price: $80 – $100

GHI Ball Python
GHI Ball Python, photo by
Probreeders

GHI Ball Python

The name GHI (according to ballpythons.net) comes from the words “gotta have hit”. This snake is definitely a ball python keepers dream to have. Although the listed price on here is $3500, we have seen them for sale at around $5,000 to $10,000, so do not be surprised if you see a figure that large for one of these snakes. They are one of the newest single gene co-dominant morphs to be discovered. (The Cleaner)

 

Price: $3500

Ivory Ball Python
Ivory Ball Python, photo by
Abigail McDufford

Ivory Ball Python

The ivory ball python is a proven co-dominant morph. It’s produced by mating yellow bellies together, which in turn produces a super yellow belly ball python, also known as an ivory ball python.

 

Price: $300

Lesser Ball Python
Lesser Ball Python, photo by
Robin

Lesser Ball Python

The lesser ball python is a beautiful snake, one of which many breeders use to create other morphs with. When using a lesser ball python, its genes tend to add color and enhance blushing. The homozygous of the Lesser is a Blue Eyed Leucistic. (pythonregius).

 

Price: $80 – $100

Mojave Ball Python
Mojave Ball Python, photo by
SNIKTTIME

Mojave Ball Python

The mojave ball python is a co-dominant mutation. One trait that mojaves have which anyone can see, is that they tend to have a complete white underside. Similar to the lesser ball python, the mojave genes are also used to create blue eyed lucys.

 

Price: $70

Mystic Ball Python
Mystic Ball Python, photo by
twistedtails

Mystic Ball Python

The mystic ball python’s genetics are co-dominant. The mystic looks a bit like the mojave, but with darker colors. Many breeders are using the mystic ball python (along with phantom and mojave ball pythons) to create a mystic potion which is a beautiful outcome containing a mixture of purple, gray, and pink markings.

 

Price: $150

Pastel Ball Python
Pastel Ball Python, photo by
Megan8706

Pastel Ball Python

The pastel ball python is one of the most popular ball python morphs bought today. A lot of breeders use the pastel to breed with other morphs to help intensify the yellow pigmentation of the offspring.

 

Price: $75 – $130

Phantom Ball Python
Phantom Ball Python, photo by
Albey

Phantom Ball Python

As stated above, the phantom ball python is very useful in generating some crazy morphs. Just to re-cap, the phantom when bred to a Lesser or Butter will produce a Blue Eyed Leucistic (Blue Eyed Lucy). When bred to a Mojave, the production is a Purple Passion.

 

Price: $125 – $150

Piebald Ball Python
Piebald Ball Python, photo by
Lancecham

Piebald Ball Python

The piebald ball python is a very wanted snake in the ball python world, only because of it’s amazing colors and markings. The piebald is a recessive trait that is partially un-pigmented with variable color and pattern mutations (Tony Gude). This snake has random patches of white throughout its body. There are two main types of piebald pythons sold, low white and high white. Low white means that there is not many white patches on the snake, while high white means there is many white patches on the snake.

 

Price: $300 – $550

Pinstripe Ball Python
Pinstripe Ball Python, photo by
Darkminion2

Pinstripe Ball Python

The pinstripe ball python is a dominate gene that does well when bred with other morphs. The name suits this snake well in terms of its stripe all along is backside. This is what gives the pinstripe its name. The base color of this snake is a nice caramel brown.

 

Price: $75 – $100

Spider Ball Python
Spider Ball Python, photo by
SND Reptiles

Spider Ball Python

The spider ball python is a co-dominant gene. It’s colors are light brown, black, and white. This snake is widely used in breeding projects for it’s back pattern that it portrays. Anything with a spider gene will look pretty awesome.

 

Price: $70

Spotnose Ball Python
Spotnose Ball Python, photo by
Aalomon

Spotnose Ball Python

The spotnose ball python is a co-dominate gene. Comparing a spotnose ball python to others, you will notice a few differences. First, are the spots on their noses. Although normal ball pythons can have this, it is more usual on spotnose ball pythons. Second, is their faded head pattern on their head. Third, is their dorsal. It is subtle, but their dorsal is several shades lighter. (kc261)

 

Price: $125 – $175

Super Blast Ball Python
Super Blast Ball Python, photo by
Zina10

Super Blast Ball Python

The super blast ball python (a.k.a killer blast ball python) is a super pastel pinstripe. It is a bright yellow snake with a light lavender head.  (ballpython777)

 

Price: $230 – $330

Vanilla Ball Python
Vanilla Ball Python, photo by
Ball Pythons 9

Vanilla Ball Python

The vanilla ball python is a co-dominant morph. It looks like more like a normal than anything, but with two noticeable differences. For one, the vanilla is brighter than normals. If you compare a normal ball python with a vanilla, you will notice that the vanilla is brighter in comparison. Along with the brighter body color, the vanilla will also portray a faded color around the top of the head.

 

Price: $175 – $400

Yellow Belly Ball Python
Yellow Belly Ball Python, photo by
LadyOhh

Yellow Belly Ball Python

The yellow belly ball python is a co-dominant gene. More information coming soon!

 

Price: $150

Morph Calculator (Genetics Wizard)

If you are interested in seeing what outcomes you can get by breeding two different ball python morphs together, you can check out the genetics wizard by WorldofBallPythons. This can give you a good overview on what offspring you can get by mixing two morphs together.

What’s the Best Ball Python Morph?

Do you have a favorite ball python morph? Share your thoughts and suggestions down below in the comments section.

Other Helpful Resources

LivingArtReptiles – View the vast amounts of different types of ball pythons here

10 Types of Tree Frogs

10
Amazon Milk Frog
Amazon Milk Frog, photo by Leszek Leszczynski

Below is a list of a few different types of tree frogs that are available in today’s pet market. Some tree frog species can be high maintenance animals, so make sure to do some reading on tree frog care before getting one.

Amazon Milk Frog
Amazon Milk Frog, photo by Leszek Leszczynski

Amazon Milk Frog

The Amazon milk frog is a very fun, robust, and hardy species of tree frogs. Properly kept milk frogs can live up to 8 years in captivity.  Their common name ‘milk frog’ refers to the poisonous, white, milky secretion that this frog secretes when threatened.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $59.99

[/su_list]

Barking Tree Frog
Barking Tree Frog, photo by
Wikimedia

Barking Tree Frog

Barking tree frogs are light green in coloration with brown spots all long it’s back. Unlike other tree frogs, this tree frog is heavier-bodied with a more granular skin. Averaging about 2 – 2 1/2 inches in length, the barking tree frog is said to be one of the larger sized tree frog species found in the Southeast.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $14.99

[/su_list]

Cuban Tree Frog
Cuban Tree Frog, photo by Wikimedia

Cuban Tree Frog

The cuban tree frog is one of the most invasive species of tree frogs found in South Florida.This is the perfect frog for beginners since they are hardy, easy to come by, and are fairly cheap. Their size ranges anywhere from 2 – 5 inches in length, making them one of the bigger sized tree frog species in North America.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $2.99 – $9.99

[/su_list]

Glass Tree Frog
Glass Tree Frog, photo by
Andrew Snyder

Glass Tree Frog

They call this frog the glass tree frog because of it’s somewhat transparency skin on it’s underside. Although it appears as a green colored frog on top, you can almost see all its internal organs from its underside due to it’s clear skin. They stay relatively small ranging from only 20 – 30 millimeters in size, so you can set up a nice little community of them in a small vivarium if you’d like.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $34.99

[/su_list]

Red Eyed Tree Frog
Red Eyed Tree Frog, photo by
Danel Solabarrieta

Red Eyed Tree Frog

The red-eyed tree frog is probably one of the most beautiful tree frogs to buy. Their neon colors make them stand out in pretty much any vivarium setup. Their colors are bright neon blue, green, orange, and red. If you are looking for a show piece in your living room, this is the frog to get. Be careful though, they can sometimes be a little hard to care for.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $29.99 – $39.99

[/su_list]

Tiger Leg Tree Frog
Ocellaris Clownfish, Captive-Bred, photo by
Bernard DUPONT

Tiger Leg Tree Frog

The tiger leg tree frog has a similar body structure as the red-eyed tree frog, but carries different colors on its skin. Coming from the Amazon Rainforest, the tiger leg tree frog spends most of its days up in trees and in a humid environment. Although they are similar to red eyed tree frogs, they are sometimes hard to come across in the pet trade, and when you do come across them, they are usually wild-caught (not born in captivity) which makes them hard to acclimate to captivity.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $23.99

[/su_list]

Mossy Frog
Mossy Frog, photo by
Ashley somplack

Vietnamese Mossy Tree Frog

The Vietnamese mossy tree frog (a.k.a mossy frog) is probably the coolest tree frog on our list to own. Their unique skin makes them look exactly like a patch of moss when sleeping. Due to their uniqueness, they are sometimes hard to come across at most pet stores. However, if you do come across one, embrace its stunning coloration and skin appearance. It’s definitely not something you’d want to miss seeing.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $44.99 – $129.99

[/su_list]

Waxy Monkey Tree Frog
Waxy Monkey Tree Frog, photo by Wild-Type

Waxy Monkey Tree Frog

The waxy monkey tree frog is an awesome amphibian, reaching lengths of only 3 inches. The difference between this tree frog from others is that this frog actually prefers a drier and warmer climate than most other tree frogs. Rather than hopping, they walk in the trees like a monkey, which gives them their nickname “monkey tree frog”. The “waxy” part comes in due to their waxy skin appearance.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $69.99 – $109.99

[/su_list]

White Lipped Tree Frog
Mossy Frog, photo by
Wikimedia

White Lipped Tree Frog

The white lipped tree frog’s body is usually a bright leaf green, which contrasts nicely to its solid white lip and lighter green dots on its sides. When hunting, the white lipped tree frog can turn to a brown color to better disguise itself to sneak up on its prey. Reaching 4 – 5.5 inches in length, the white lipped tree frog is one of the largest tree frogs in the world.

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $250 – $260

[/su_list]

Whites Tree Frog
Whites Tree Frog, photo by
Wikimedia

Whites Tree Frog

The whites tree frog is the most common type of pet tree frog in captivity today. They are quite hardy with a reputation of being one of the easiest tree frogs to care for in the pet trade. If you like a little variety and uniqueness, the whites tree frog can sometimes be bought with blue eyes. Being a little more unique with blue eyes, the price will be a little higher.

 

[su_list icon=”icon: tag”]

  • Price: $29.99

[/su_list]

 

The type of tree frog that you are looking for may or may not be on here. There are many more tree frog species being sold at different locations ranging from all sorts of colors like blue, red, yellow, orange, green, and etc… The prices also vary in different locations. The more rare the tree frog is in your area, the more money it will cost you to get one. Sometimes, buying online will save you a lot of money.

Whats Your Favorite Type of Tree Frog?

Do you know of another type of tree frog that makes a great pet? What’s your favorite type of tree frog? Share with us your thoughts and recommendations below in the comments section.

Stay Connected

0FansLike
1,286FollowersFollow
Newsletter Signup!
Join hundreds of pet lovers like yourself and receive all updates in your inbox, for free!
Never display this again!